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Bad Neighborhoods, Part One

Austin's neighborhood Nazis are at it again. In an article about the current activities of the Envision Central Texas project, a inoffensively driven planning exercise which seeks to lay out in broad brushes whether people all over the place are really against sprawl or not; the Statesman wrote:

Austin neighborhood leaders also are worried the scenarios could hurt the character of their neighborhoods. Bryan King, president of the Austin Council of Neighborhoods, said the type of density envisioned for neighborhoods in Scenario D could be disastrous. "Any scenario that is chosen must respond to neighborhood plans," King said. "The neighborhood plans come first. Envision Central Texas comes second."

Back when I worked on the Old West Austin neighborhood plan; it was understood that this exercise was fundamentally a way for central-city neighborhoods to show where additional density should occur; not whether it should occur. And we took that responsibility seriously; advocating additional development (both commercial and residential) on the edges and in a few places in the interior of the neighborhood. Since then, every neighborhood of note in the city, including my new neighborhood in North University, has used this process to try to push all densification out to commercial arterials; and even there in absurdly limited terms. The same people who fought the Villas, a reasonable apartment complex right next to Guadalupe Street within walking distance of UT, are fighting future similarly smart infill projects throughout Austin's central city. And all of these wankers drive cars with SoS stickers on them. Oh, the irony.

This entry was posted in the following categories: When Neighborhoods Go Bad